The first time we saw a product from Cello, we were impressed. It was a 32-inch gaming monitor that had built in Freesync. The highlight? It was cheap with a lot of functionality. That seems to be Cello’s bread and butter. Cramming as much tech as possible into a product, and then manufacturer and sell it for as cheap as possible, to bring competitive prices to the market. It’s no different here, with the Cello C4020G. It’s a 40-inch television that can produce a 1080p image, but its main selling point is the fact it’s got the Android TV system powering it.

So taking a look at the TV itself, you can pretty much tell that it’s a budget model. It still retains the larger back from TVs from a few years ago, its glossy bezels aren’t exactly the skinniest, measuring several milimeters although it still looks pretty smart from the front. Branding has been kept to an absolute minimum, with a tiny Cello logo on the bottom centre though which is nice. One thing you will instantly notice though when taking it out of the box is its weight. There’s nothing to it, which makes it perfect for mounting onto a wall, even if it’s made from plasterboard. There are though a couple of plastic feet, which aren’t the best quality, but does mean you can rest it on a stand if desired. Be warned though, the feet stand at each end, and the dimension with the feet added comes in at 931(W) x 554(H) x 190(D)mm so make sure your TV unit is big enough first.

cello c4020g tv review
£269.99
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as of November 20, 2020 13:46

As I’ve mentioned mounting, let’s move round the back. To start, there is a VESA200 mounting system available if you want to stick it on the wall. And in terms of inputs, everything is extremely basic. There are three HDMI inputs, although I’ve struggled to find out the version. You’ve also got RCA Component and separate audio input, a headphone jack and for digital audio, an optical input. Down the left hand side you’ve got two USB inputs as well as your aerial connection for Freeview capability. The USB inputs are to either play content from an external device, or to record directly from the Freeview tuner so you can record programs to watch in the future. The network input is for those who want to hardwire their TVs into their internet sources.

cello c4020g tv review

In terms of connectivity, everything is there that you would need to get started with plugging external devices into the TV. There are things I never bothered with, and relied on the wireless capabilities of the TV to get my content, like the aerial input. I don’t have an aerial at my address anymore, so the Freeview stuff we receive here in the UK was ignored during our testing. But if you have, then you’ve got the capability to watch Freeview content.

There are a couple of small down firing speakers that are 8watts each. They’re not the best at all. They’ll be okay for that secondary portable TV you put in your bedroom or in the dining room while you eat for some background noise, but you’re not going to be enjoying any big blockbuster Hollywood movie sound here. It also sounds a little dead, and by that I mean it’s almost as if Cello has just flattened out the EQ of the speakers. A little boost to the treble would have gone a long way. Being small speakers though, the bass is non-existant. If you want better audio quality, make use of the optical input and connect a soundbar.

cello c4020g tv review

So, let’s get to why you would buy this television, and that’s the Android TV capability, which incorporates Google Chromecast, Google Play Store and the Google Assistant. If you’ve got an Android smartphone, then you’re going to feel right at home here. The Google Play Store is where you can receive your apps, and the majority of them have been tailored to your television. I couldn’t see any apps, maybe within the games, that were not compatible with televisions. Most of them are visual based. So think things like Disney+, Amazon Prime Video, VLC for Android, MX Player and Plex and all those other decent apps. Oh, and there’s even Pelaton if you wanted to do your bike workouts.

cello c4020g tv review

For the most part, each app we tried, and to be perfectly honest with you, we’ve not got Plex servers, or dive into Hulu, but for the likes of Netflix, Amazon Prime View, BBC iPlayer and other catch up and on-demand TV services, everything worked well. The only gripe I have with the TV is the loading times, and the stuttery menu. We’ve at times clicked to go through a menu, only to click again because we thought it wasn’t working, and then jumping through several menus because the TV needs time to catch up to itself. It’s frustrating, and more than likely comes down to the slow processor inside.

cello c4020g tv review
cello c4020g tv review

Another thing that isn’t hugely accurate are Google Voice Searches, but I can’t really blame Cello for that. I searched for Ready Player One by saying “Hi Google, search for Ready Player One”. I was expecting it to show me a Netflix result, as it’s just appeared on Netflix here in the UK. But it didn’t. It showed me a link to Google Movies to rent the film, and some IMDB info. Searching for The Terminator showed me the same thing. Only certain series searches I made, like for The Haunting Of Hill House, showed me an ‘Available on Netflix’ button.

cello c4020g tv review

It’s great to see though that Cello have retained some control over the quality of your picture though. The usual things you can expect are for backlight, brightness, colour and sharpening. But to see manual control over colour temperatures and individual colour strengths was pretty impressive. It means that you can fine tune your image to your liking, and it helps for sure. Watching Our Planet on Netflix, and yes, you can instantly tell it’s at 1080p rather than the super sharp 4K we’ve come to expect, but the picture is sharp. To run the TV through its paces, I used our Datacolor SpyderX to test out some of various aspects of this TV, and interestingly, the TV performs best at around 50% brightness, especially when contrast ratios are concerned. Cello claim the TV has a contrast ratio of 5000:1, but through testing our panel came out closer to 2000:1. And colour accuracy? Forget about it. The Delta-E score was off the charts, averaging at 5.28. But it did cover 95% of the sRGB colour spectrum. Our testing results are below.

With any cheap budget TV there’s always going to be trade-offs, and here the biggest one for me is the speed in which you can get through menus. It’s a little laggy when it comes to this, and it did get on my nerves quite a bit during testing. However, if you’re someone who finds a series, binges it, and doesn’t touch the remote until you’re ready to turn it off, it probably won’t bother you. For those zipping from one YouTube video to the next, then yes, you’re going to get annoyed. The picture quality for me was the most surprising. Of course it’s not going to match your Samsungs and LGs in terms of colour reproduction, sharpness or even brightness, but if you’re looking for a television to stick in your bedroom to watch content while drifting off to sleep, you can’t really go wrong here. The sound quality is naff, but that’s expected from any televisions these days. But for Cello to include Android TV on their new range, and the amount of content, especially free content that you can get from this product, is unbelievable. The Cello C4020G Android TV costs around £235 online, which is an absolute steal in my eyes. For more information, head over to the Cello website.