Skullcandy Crusher Wireless Headphones Review
The Good
  • Really well designed and built quality superb
The Bad
  • Too much bass for certain genres of music
  • Caters for the bass market out there
3.9Overall Score

It’s all about the bass, ’bout the bass, no treble with the new Skullcandy Crusher Wireless headphones. Okay, that’s a bit of an exaggeration but thanks to its focus on those really low bass frequencies, your post-dubstep UK Bass music has never sounded so good. The bass here, following in the footsteps of the original set of Crusher headphones could even really be too much for some bass heads to handle.

But in terms of build, the Crusher Wireless headphones are really comfy thanks to the generous padding provided around each earcup. They give users an on-ear feel, depending on ear size of course. For those with smaller sized lugholes, you’ll probably find that the padding totally covers the entire circumference of your ear. In any case, the Crusher Wireless cans will block out a fair chunk of external noise, but unfortunately fail to keep much in, as we’ve found on various quiet commuter trains. I’ve been told twice to turn down my music on the way home.

On the left earcup you will find your USB port to charge the internal 40-hour battery and auxiliary jack plug for those times you need a wired connection. There is also the bass slider which will control the amount of bass that flows through the headphones. This is really the culprit to sound leakage, and turning this down will provide a better environment for others around you. Put the bass too high however and your head will literally feel rattled by the end of the song.

On the right side you will see some enlarged playful buttons to control the Bluetooth connection as well as volume up and down, which double up as a skip track option. They’re nice and big, making it easier to feel for them while the headphones are on your head, and is something that I myself really like about the design of the Skullcandy Crusher Wireless headphones. The entire set is covered in a soft plastic, with the headband being coated in a thin layer of foam. Not the best we’ve seen in a set of headphones, but it’s still comfortable for longer periods of listening time. The band itself inside is metal for added durability. There are two exposed cables which I can see getting damaged after owning them for a long while by throwing them in your bag and such, but they’re here to compensate for the extra length they need then in the folded position.

As the headphones state, these have the ability to literally crush your brain and make your head feel rattled. But saying that, the adjustable bass slider is a welcome feature. At the very high end, the tracks almost seem unrecognisable due to nothing but pure low responses in your ears. Turning this down however will then offer you a much nicer balance of high and mid frequencies. Even at the lower end of the slider, the bass frequencies are still extremely present which as I said at the start would please the bass heads out there. But if you’re going to be listening to pop or maybe orchestral music, I would avoid these.

But the added focus on bass doesn’t necessarily make these headphones bad, they’re just catered for a very selective market. If UK Bass or EDM is your thing, go for it. Although they’re priced at around £129.99 online they’re not a bad price considering. You can find out more information at Skullcandy’s brilliantly designed website here.

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Stef Murphy

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